Posted: 04/06/2011 10:16:05 by Nigel Nixon

A GOVERNMENT appointed planning inspector has ruled that an ancient Lake District fell pass is out of bounds for motorised vehicles.

The decision by the Secretary of State to make Garburn Pass, between Troutbeck and Kentmere, a ‘restricted byway’ follows three years of legal argument.

It means that any motorist or motorcyclist using the pass is committing a criminal offence and could face serious legal consequences.

The inspector went through hundreds of pages of documents ranging from maps of 1822, guide books of the 1880s, and photographs of motorbikes using the pass in the 1920s.

The Lake District National Park Authority has also announced that thanks to around £55,000 of Government funding invested in repairs following the 2009 floods, the pass is probably in better condition than it has been for hundreds of years.

“The storms of November 2009 badly damaged both sides of the pass, especially the western side where the track effectively became a river, and most of the surface ended up on the main road,” said National Park Countryside Access Adviser Nick Thorne.

“We were able to obtain significant funding under the Paths for the Public Project, funded by Defra, the Rural Development Programme for England, and Cumbria County Council. And we have now completely rebuilt the worst affected areas in three stages with the work being carried out by our own staff, the National Trust, and a local contractor.”



Posted: 04/06/2011 10:14:30 by Nigel Nixon

THOUSANDS of punters flocked to Cartmel Races for the course’s biggest meeting of the year, spread over three days.

The traditional Bank Holiday Monday event attracted a crowd of 16,000 to watch the seven races.

Jonathan Garratt, Cartmel Racecourse managing director, said the bookies did not fare too badly.

“I think it has been mixed; they have had some favourites going in but I’m sure they have had ups and downs.”

Punters successfully backed legendary racer Tony McCoy, who appeared on Monday.

Yesterday, too, proved a rare highlight for racegoers as three Cheltenham Festival horses went on parade for Veterans Day.

Chief Dan George, who is trained just a mile from Cartmel by Jimmy Moffatt, was joined by Mister McGoldrick and Hussard Collonges.

“We have had a lot of people who are on half-term holiday but it’s also the day when racing enthusiasts from all over the country come and have their day at Cartmel because the course is slightly less overcrowded,” said Mr Garratt.

Meanwhile, a racing steward became the first person to join an exclusive Cartmel ‘club’.

Officiating at Saturday’s races signalled a landmark for Colin Vickers — it meant he had visited every racecourse in Britain.

Cartmel Racecourse chairman Lord Cavendish presented Mr Vickers with a souvenir badge, which coincided with the launch of an I’ve Saved The Best Until Last club.

Anyone completing a visit to all Britain’s racecourses with a trip to Cartmel will now receive one of the specially-commissioned badges.

Mr Garratt said: “When I came here I was amazed how many people said they had been to every other racecourse before they tasted the unique delights of Cartmel.

“I realised that they were saving the best until last.”

Tagged with: Horses, Races, Cartmel


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