Posted: 01/05/2012 10:13:20 by Nigel Nixon

A MAN who discovered a 48-year-old bar of Kendal Mint Cake in his loft believes it may be the oldest-surviving bar of the famous confectionery.

Peter Truelove, 68, of Windermere, bought the bar of Robert Wiper’s Original Mint Cake when he and a friend visited Kendal as 21-year-olds in 1964.

The pair were on a ‘boy’s adventure’ which took them from their homes in Kent to John O’Groats, the most northerly point on the Scottish mainland.

“We travelled the distance in an Austin 7 and it took us a week,” said Mr Truelove, of Hill Top. “The car only did 35mph at best and it was blizzard weather – the snow was coming into the car.

“We called at Kendal on the way back and we’d heard about the mint cake, so when we saw some we thought we’d buy a bar.”

Mr Truelove said he was not sure why he had kept the bar in a box in his loft.

“It was on a shelf as a memento of the trip but it’s been in the loft since we moved to Windermere 16 years ago,” he said. The bar is still in reasonable condition although some of the sugar is seeping through the wrapping.

Although the original Wipers recipe is still used, the company was sold to Romneys in 1987.

Managing director John Barron said: “We have been making it all these years and I don’t think we have any that old – it’s impressive.

“It wouldn’t do him any harm to eat it now but I don’t expect it would taste very nice.”

Mr Truelove said what was also interesting to discover was the journal he wrote while travelling, which documented the stop-off in Kendal. He said: “I had to record everything we spent because my friend and I were splitting the cost of the trip. It’s funny now to look back and see that someone offered to sell us a car engine and gear box for £2.50, and that 15 litres of petrol was 60p.

“Unfortunately, the price of the mint cake wasn’t included, although I did write that we’d visited and purchased it.”

 

Tagged with: Kendal, Mint, Oldest, Cake


Posted: 04/06/2011 10:14:30 by Nigel Nixon

THOUSANDS of punters flocked to Cartmel Races for the course’s biggest meeting of the year, spread over three days.

The traditional Bank Holiday Monday event attracted a crowd of 16,000 to watch the seven races.

Jonathan Garratt, Cartmel Racecourse managing director, said the bookies did not fare too badly.

“I think it has been mixed; they have had some favourites going in but I’m sure they have had ups and downs.”

Punters successfully backed legendary racer Tony McCoy, who appeared on Monday.

Yesterday, too, proved a rare highlight for racegoers as three Cheltenham Festival horses went on parade for Veterans Day.

Chief Dan George, who is trained just a mile from Cartmel by Jimmy Moffatt, was joined by Mister McGoldrick and Hussard Collonges.

“We have had a lot of people who are on half-term holiday but it’s also the day when racing enthusiasts from all over the country come and have their day at Cartmel because the course is slightly less overcrowded,” said Mr Garratt.

Meanwhile, a racing steward became the first person to join an exclusive Cartmel ‘club’.

Officiating at Saturday’s races signalled a landmark for Colin Vickers — it meant he had visited every racecourse in Britain.

Cartmel Racecourse chairman Lord Cavendish presented Mr Vickers with a souvenir badge, which coincided with the launch of an I’ve Saved The Best Until Last club.

Anyone completing a visit to all Britain’s racecourses with a trip to Cartmel will now receive one of the specially-commissioned badges.

Mr Garratt said: “When I came here I was amazed how many people said they had been to every other racecourse before they tasted the unique delights of Cartmel.

“I realised that they were saving the best until last.”

Tagged with: Horses, Races, Cartmel


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