Posted: 26/02/2012 12:42:56 by Nigel Nixon

A Tree which stands in a Lake District wood is the tallest in Cumbria and could be the largest in the North West.

The 57.8-metre giant grand fir in Skelghyll Wood, Ambleside, has also been recorded as the tallest of its species in England, breaking the previous Cumbrian record of 55 metres, which was held by a conifer at Thirlmere.

National Trust ranger John Pring got the idea to get the tree measured and recorded by the National Tree Register charity when driving through Ambleside.

He said: “I’ve driven on that main road (A591) in Ambleside for a long time and I just thought: ‘That really is a very big tree, I wonder how big it is?  We were surprised just how tall it was when we measured it. There are some very big trees in the area but we didn’t realise how tall it actually was. This is just one of the thousands of big old trees the National Trust looks after in the area.”

Mr Pring, who has covered Windermere and Ambleside for 20 years, is now encouraging nature lovers to go to Skelghyll Wood and see the true scale of how tall the trees are for themselves and the grand fir, which was planted in 1860, looks set to continue growing and could push the 60-metre mark unless there are any accidents such as a storm blowing it over.

The tree was measured by tree climbers Mark Sigrift and Mick Lupton of Aspen Tree Management in Witherslack by dropping a long tape measure and using a badminton pole to attach a tape measure.  “It just shows that the tree is happy with the climate there,” said Mr Pring. It’s only 160 years old so it is still growing.”

 

Tagged with: Tallest, Tree, Fir


Posted: 07/10/2011 09:41:20 by Nigel Nixon

POTENTIALLY deadly blue-green algae has been found on Windermere.

The Environment Agency says it has found evidence of an algal bloom at Low Wray Bay, prompting South Lakeland District Council to issue a warning.

The authority said anyone using lakes, rivers and reservoirs should treat all blue-green algae blooms with caution and contact should be avoided as skin rashes and illness may occur if the water is swallowed.

Farmers and pet owners should also prevent livestock and animals coming into contact or drinking the affected water, as it can sometimes prove fatal for animals.

SLDC’s environmental health team leader, Tracy Howard, said: “Blue-green algae can potentially make people feel quite ill if swallowed or even by just swimming in it.

"We just want people to be aware of the affects and are asking people to be extra careful and vigilant when using the lakes and rivers for recreational purposes during the summer months.

"The public should observe any notices near affected areas and avoid contact or drinking the water.”

Many waters are vulnerable to problems with the algae, typically between June and November.

Experts say all blue-green algal blooms should be assumed to be toxic.

The blooms vary in colour from discoloured green, blue-green, greenish brown, or reddish brown.

Further information about blue-green algae can be found on the Environment Agency’s website at www.environment-agency.gov.uk

Tagged with: windermere, algae


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