Posted: 12/02/2013 19:28:14 by Nigel Nixon

ARCHAEOLOGY enthusiasts are being urged to get involved with the third and final stage of a project looking at the industrial past of the Lake District.

‘Reflections on History’ is a joint project by the Lake District National Park and the National Trust and provides opportunities for local people to learn about the past industries of Windermere.

The project has already looked at the industrial themes of woodland and water power but the third stage, starting in April, will take place at the lead mines and slate quarries in Grasmere and Langdale.

 

An introductory day, including a guided walk to Banks Quarry, Langdale, will be held next month for would-be participants to find out more.

“No prior knowledge or experience is required and on-site training will be provided by qualified archaeologists,” said LDNPA Archaeology and Heritage Assistant Holly Beavitt- Pike.

“However given the remote location and nature of the sites it is important that volunteers can demonstrate a reasonable level of fitness in order to take part in the work,” she added.

The day begins at 11am on March 9 and is at Langdale Village Hall, Chapel Stile.

Tagged with: langdale, archaeology


Posted: 07/10/2011 09:41:20 by Nigel Nixon

POTENTIALLY deadly blue-green algae has been found on Windermere.

The Environment Agency says it has found evidence of an algal bloom at Low Wray Bay, prompting South Lakeland District Council to issue a warning.

The authority said anyone using lakes, rivers and reservoirs should treat all blue-green algae blooms with caution and contact should be avoided as skin rashes and illness may occur if the water is swallowed.

Farmers and pet owners should also prevent livestock and animals coming into contact or drinking the affected water, as it can sometimes prove fatal for animals.

SLDC’s environmental health team leader, Tracy Howard, said: “Blue-green algae can potentially make people feel quite ill if swallowed or even by just swimming in it.

"We just want people to be aware of the affects and are asking people to be extra careful and vigilant when using the lakes and rivers for recreational purposes during the summer months.

"The public should observe any notices near affected areas and avoid contact or drinking the water.”

Many waters are vulnerable to problems with the algae, typically between June and November.

Experts say all blue-green algal blooms should be assumed to be toxic.

The blooms vary in colour from discoloured green, blue-green, greenish brown, or reddish brown.

Further information about blue-green algae can be found on the Environment Agency’s website at www.environment-agency.gov.uk

Tagged with: windermere, algae


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