Posted: 12/02/2013 19:28:14 by Nigel Nixon

ARCHAEOLOGY enthusiasts are being urged to get involved with the third and final stage of a project looking at the industrial past of the Lake District.

‘Reflections on History’ is a joint project by the Lake District National Park and the National Trust and provides opportunities for local people to learn about the past industries of Windermere.

The project has already looked at the industrial themes of woodland and water power but the third stage, starting in April, will take place at the lead mines and slate quarries in Grasmere and Langdale.

 

An introductory day, including a guided walk to Banks Quarry, Langdale, will be held next month for would-be participants to find out more.

“No prior knowledge or experience is required and on-site training will be provided by qualified archaeologists,” said LDNPA Archaeology and Heritage Assistant Holly Beavitt- Pike.

“However given the remote location and nature of the sites it is important that volunteers can demonstrate a reasonable level of fitness in order to take part in the work,” she added.

The day begins at 11am on March 9 and is at Langdale Village Hall, Chapel Stile.

Tagged with: langdale, archaeology


Posted: 26/02/2012 12:42:56 by Nigel Nixon

A Tree which stands in a Lake District wood is the tallest in Cumbria and could be the largest in the North West.

The 57.8-metre giant grand fir in Skelghyll Wood, Ambleside, has also been recorded as the tallest of its species in England, breaking the previous Cumbrian record of 55 metres, which was held by a conifer at Thirlmere.

National Trust ranger John Pring got the idea to get the tree measured and recorded by the National Tree Register charity when driving through Ambleside.

He said: “I’ve driven on that main road (A591) in Ambleside for a long time and I just thought: ‘That really is a very big tree, I wonder how big it is?  We were surprised just how tall it was when we measured it. There are some very big trees in the area but we didn’t realise how tall it actually was. This is just one of the thousands of big old trees the National Trust looks after in the area.”

Mr Pring, who has covered Windermere and Ambleside for 20 years, is now encouraging nature lovers to go to Skelghyll Wood and see the true scale of how tall the trees are for themselves and the grand fir, which was planted in 1860, looks set to continue growing and could push the 60-metre mark unless there are any accidents such as a storm blowing it over.

The tree was measured by tree climbers Mark Sigrift and Mick Lupton of Aspen Tree Management in Witherslack by dropping a long tape measure and using a badminton pole to attach a tape measure.  “It just shows that the tree is happy with the climate there,” said Mr Pring. It’s only 160 years old so it is still growing.”

 

Tagged with: Tallest, Tree, Fir


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