Posted: 26/02/2012 12:42:56 by Nigel Nixon

A Tree which stands in a Lake District wood is the tallest in Cumbria and could be the largest in the North West.

The 57.8-metre giant grand fir in Skelghyll Wood, Ambleside, has also been recorded as the tallest of its species in England, breaking the previous Cumbrian record of 55 metres, which was held by a conifer at Thirlmere.

National Trust ranger John Pring got the idea to get the tree measured and recorded by the National Tree Register charity when driving through Ambleside.

He said: “I’ve driven on that main road (A591) in Ambleside for a long time and I just thought: ‘That really is a very big tree, I wonder how big it is?  We were surprised just how tall it was when we measured it. There are some very big trees in the area but we didn’t realise how tall it actually was. This is just one of the thousands of big old trees the National Trust looks after in the area.”

Mr Pring, who has covered Windermere and Ambleside for 20 years, is now encouraging nature lovers to go to Skelghyll Wood and see the true scale of how tall the trees are for themselves and the grand fir, which was planted in 1860, looks set to continue growing and could push the 60-metre mark unless there are any accidents such as a storm blowing it over.

The tree was measured by tree climbers Mark Sigrift and Mick Lupton of Aspen Tree Management in Witherslack by dropping a long tape measure and using a badminton pole to attach a tape measure.  “It just shows that the tree is happy with the climate there,” said Mr Pring. It’s only 160 years old so it is still growing.”

 

Tagged with: Tallest, Tree, Fir


Posted: 06/04/2011 21:15:43 by Anne-Marie O'Neill

‘VERY knowledgable’ staff at a popular Kendal attraction are celebrating after securing a top accreditation.

Kendal Museum has been accredited as a Quality Assured Visitor Attraction - an assessment run by Visit England and recognises customer service and visitor experience at attractions across the country.

A Visit England assessor praised the strong collections, recognising the effort that has gone into creating a well-balanced wildlife gallery and the considerable effort that has been put into modernising the Wainwright Gallery.

In a report, the assessor said of the museum: “The Wildlife Gallery succeeds in presenting specimens from five continents in an imaginative and lively fashion that can be readily grasped by children”.

Learning facilities for children were also praised along with ‘excellent’ reading books being available.

The Wainwright Gallery was also commended for its cabinets and the assessor said that the staff ‘engaged well and were very knowledgeable’.

The assessor summed up his judgement and reported: “There is a wealth of excellent material in the museum – with the Wildlife Gallery and the Wainwright exhibits showing what can be achieved. The possibilities for mutually beneficial exchanges of skills with college courses and museum qualifications seem exciting. There is huge potential scope for the Museum.”



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